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Theft Crimes in Colorado – An Overview

Theft crimes in Colorado encompass a broad range of offenses involving theft of property or services. And, depending on the value of the stolen items, Colorado classifies theft crimes as petty offenses, misdemeanors, or felonies. We previously looked at common crimes of Holiday Theft in Colorado. In this article, we’ll look at some of the common theft crimes in Colorado, their classifications, and the penalties that each classification of theft carries.

Colorado Theft

What Are Common Theft Crimes in Colorado?

In Colorado, a person commits theft when he or she knowingly obtains, retains, or exercises control over anything of value belonging to another person without the owner’s permission or by threat or deception, and intends to permanently deprive the owner of the property or thing of value. This definition is broad enough to cover most theft crimes in Colorado. However, Colorado also recognizes a number of specific crimes of theft. These specific theft crimes in Colorado include:

Classification of Theft Crimes in Colorado

In Colorado, theft is classified as a petty offense, a misdemeanor, or a felony (sometimes called Grand Theft) depending on the value of the stolen item. Let’s look at the possible theft classifications below in increasing levels of seriousness.

  • Petty theft involves stolen property or services valued at less than $50.
  • Class 3 misdemeanor involves stolen property or services valued between $50 and $299.99.
  • Class 2 misdemeanor involves stolen property or services valued between $300 and $749.99.
  • Class 1 misdemeanor involves stolen property or services valued between $750 and $1999.99.
  • Class 6 felony involves stolen property or services valued between $2000 and $4999.99.
  • Class 5 felony involves stolen property or services valued between $5000 and $19,999.99.
  • Class 4 felony involves stolen property or services valued between $20,000 and $99,999.99.
  • Class 3 felony involves stolen property or services valued between $100,000 and $999,999.99.
  • Class 2 felony involves stolen property or services valued at $1,000,000 or more.

Penalties for Theft Crimes in Colorado

Potential penalties for theft crimes in Colorado are determined by the classification of the theft offense. However, repeat felons could face increased penalties based on the number and classification of their prior theft convictions and time between convictions. Below are the general range of penalties associated with theft crimes in Colorado.

  • Petty theft offenders face a maximum penalty of 6 months’ imprisonment, a $500 fine, or both.
  • Class 3 misdemeanor offenders face a maximum penalty of 6 months’ imprisonment, a $750 fine, or both.
  • Class 2 misdemeanor offenders face a maximum penalty of 364 days’ imprisonment, a $1000 fine, or both.
  • Class 1 misdemeanor offenders face a maximum penalty of 18 months’ imprisonment, a $5000 fine, or both.
  • Class 6 felony offenders face a maximum penalty of 18 months’ imprisonment, a $100,000 fine, or both.
  • Class 5 felony offenders face a maximum penalty of 3 years’ imprisonment, a $100,000 fine, or both.
  • Class 4 felony offenders face a maximum penalty of 6 years’ imprisonment, a $500,000 fine, or both.
  • Class 3 felony offenders face a maximum penalty of 12 years’ imprisonment, a $750,000 fine, or both.
  • Class 2 felony offenders face a maximum penalty of 24 years’ imprisonment, a $1,000,000 fine, or both.

If you’ve been charged with a theft crime in Colorado, it’s important to contact an experienced criminal defense attorney early in the process. An attorney can help you defend your case and protect your rights. A criminal record can limit your ability to get employment, housing, and financing, among other things.

Need Legal Help?

If you are in need of criminal defense or family law help, consider reaching out to Nicol Gersch Petterson for a free 30-minute consultation. Find more information at https://CoLawTeam.com or call 970.670.0378.

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